There’s something about the word “Ribs”, isn’t there?
I don’t know about you, but when Ribs are on the menu,
I just get this nice, warm,
cosy feeling inside.
Maybe I’m a little crazy about ribs, but there has to be more of us out there.

So, ribs are overflowing in the counter at Schinkels’ this week,
so ribs are suddenly on the menu at the Schinkel home tonight.

I’ve done ribs a number of different ways over the years,
from crock pot to barbecue to oven.
Couple key words to remember are “Low & Slow” when dealing with ribs.
Because there are those heat-conducting bones in there,
one doesn’t want to use high heat,
or they will dry out very easily.

The Andrea Method

Tonight, I decided to combine a bunch of methods
into what I will be referring to as
“The Andrea Method of Cooking Perfect Ribs”.
You can call it whatever you like, I’m not copyrighting it or anything.

Started with my original rib recipe and “tweaked it” a bit

 

Honey Garlic Ribs

I asked my kids as they left this morning if
they wanted honey garlic or sweet and sour ribs tonight.
There was an animated discussion that may or may not
have included various threats and bribes,
but the consensus was Honey Garlic by a narrow margin.

I have this secret recipe I use for all my Honey Garlic recipes.
I don’t usually go about doing this, but I’m going to share it with you.

Start with a whole bunch of garlic cloves and crush them with a press.
I’m cooking 4 racks of ribs, so I crushed about 8 cloves of larger garlic
I bought from this local grower on Highway 3. Lots of garlic.

I sautéd that in butter until it was slightly browned,

then added about 3/4 cup of honey and 3/4 cup of soy sauce.
I used my brawn to pureé almost 2 cups of my salsa…
Originally, the recipe called for ketchup,
but I just can’t bring myself to use that when I
have my own homemade salsa in the house.

Salsa is a good substitute for almost anything


If you are likewise opposed to ketchup but
don’t have my homemade salsa on hand,
you could use any pasta sauce as an alternative.
Simmered this mixture for a few minutes,

and then poured it over top the ribs in my roaster.
I think the roaster was set for 250°F and
I left them roasting for about 4 hours,
until the bones were poking out from the meat.

Always better on the ‘Q

So, now, my ribs were technically cooked,
but I personally like quickly grilling them to caramelize the sauce.
So, I had already pre-heated the BBQ and lay them out on it for
just a few minutes each side.
Just long enough to get some grill lines on the meaty side
and to get the juices sizzling on the other.

While I was grilling, I entered “Phase II” of the Andrea Method.
I took all the lovely juices that were in my roaster and
transferred them to a heavy saucepan.

Phase II

Added some sour cream and used my Braun hand mixer
to really whisk it together and let that simmer while
the ribs were on the ‘Q.
Made a nice, thick, creamy sauce that I used when
I served it all up at the table.

So, when the ribs were just right, I removed them from the grill
and placed them in a large casserole dish

and poured about half the sauce over them,

then covered it all with foil for about 5 minutes
while I got the kids to set the table.

Served the ribs onto plates,
and added more sauce for good measure,
just because I like sauce.

That’s it. Not too difficult, and really, super delicious. 

What more can I ask for?